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Events in Drought-Stricken India Parallel Recent Experience in California

Groundwater aquifers are being sucked dry amidst a two year-long drought as Indian farmers drill and pump more groundwater in bids to make up for shortfalls in precipitation resulting from the delayed onset of weaker summer monsoon rains.

Kenyans Turn to Foraging as Californians Bail Out from Torrential Rains

Kenyans are foraging for plants and instects that contain toxic chemicals and cooking them in unsafe water as Californians are struggling to cope with record breaking rains.

Rwanda Green Fund Investments Paying Big Dividends

Issuing its ninth request for proposals this week, Rwanda’s Green Fund, FONERWA continues to empower Rwandans, funding and assisting stakeholders to carry out projects that improve socioeconomic conditions, create employment and new business development opportunities while leveraging and conserving the country’s natural capital.

FAO Completes World’s First Global Assessment of Drylands Forests

Using free online GIS and open source software, more than 200 FAO researchers completed the groundbreaking study in less than a year.

Federal Funding for 76 Water-Energy Conservation Projects in 13 Western States

The Dept. of Agriculture and Dept. of Interior’s Bureau of Land Reclamation are investing $47 million in shared-cost funding in joining with local authorities, farmers and ranchers to improve water conservation and energy efficiency, as well as enhance drought response,

Tampa Bay Blue Carbon Study Highlights Threats to Coastal Ecosystems

Coastal ecosystems – marshes, bogs, swamps, seagrass beds and mangroves among them – provide a wide range of beneficial services that have all too often been unknown to or ignored, including serving as carbon sinks. A ¨blue carbon¨ study by non-profit Restore America’s Estuaries puts numbers on the amount of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) seagrasses, marshes and mangroves in the…

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Oxford Examines Africa Mobile Payments and Sustainable Water Finance

Leveraging the popularity of simple, text message-based mobile payments and wireless POS terminals could make it easier for water utilities in Africa to obtain sustainable finance to expand and improve water infrastructure and services, according to a new study from Oxford University.