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Risk of Southwest Megadrought Higher than Thought

The risks of prolonged “megadrought” across the U.S. Southwest, as well as arid/semi-arid regions around the world are substantially higher than believed, according to scientists from Cornell, the University of Arizona and the U.S. Geological Survey.

New Research Reveals Climate Warming 55 MYA was Geologically Instantaneous

New research into past changes in climate indicates that global warming can take place much more suddenly than previously thought – over the course of only about 13 years. Temperatures at high latitudes rose as much as 8ºC (14ºF) and oceans warmed from surface to bottom some 55 million years ago during what’s known as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM)….

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Analogues from Earth’s Past Bode Ill for Coral Reefs, Marine Ecosystems

In a bid to anticipate the effects of a warming world, climate scientists around the world are scouring the geological record for modern-day analogues – periods of Earth history when the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere reached or exceeded the 400 parts per million (ppm) we find today. Delving into climate, marine biology, ecosystems and the marine…

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Study of the Arctic Pliocene will reveal clues to climate change today and into the future

Study of Pliocene Arctic Yields Insights into Climate Change Today, and for the Future

The mean monthly average concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere as measured at NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory at Mauna Loa, Hawaii exceeded 400 parts per million (ppm) for the first time in modern history back in May. The last time atmospheric CO2 reached this level was during the Pliocene Epoch some 3 million to 5 million years ago,…

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