Quantcast
Orbiting Carbon Observatory

2000-Year High in Annual CO2 Emissions Set During 2015-2016 El Nino

Drought and high temperatures compromised the health of tropical rain forests across South America, Africa and the Asia-Pacific during the 2015/2016 El Nino, leading to a spike in carbon dioxide emissions, according to an analysis of data from the NASA’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory.

Latest Projections of Regional Sea Level Rise Emphasize Need for Ongoing Research, Adaptation Planning

Sea level rise along all U.S. coasts barring Alaska is projected to be higher than the global average in the three worst-case scenarios — 0.3-1 meter or more come 2100 — according to the latest projections from a public-private climate research partnership led by NOAA

U.S. Weather and Climate 2016: 15 $1 Billion-Plus Disasters

Ranking as the second warmest year on record, 2016 was the 20th consecutive year average U.S. temperature exceed the norm. The 15 weather/climate related disasters that each resulted in losses of more than $1 billion contributed to making 2016 the second-worst year on record, according to NOAA’s latest annual report.

New Approaches Needed as Blazing Hot, Dry Conditions Lead to Longer, More Intense Wildfires

High temperatures and lack of precipitation have brought an early onset to the wildfire season, highlighting a continuing trend that requires improving the way we manage landscapes to enhance their resilience, according to the U.S. Interior Dept.

Renewables Could Meet Most of U.S. Power Needs, Cut GHG Emissions 78%

Renewable resources could meet most of U.S. electricity needs at costs comparable to today’s even as demand for electrical power increases. National greenhouse gas emissions could be slashed 78% by doing so, according to a new study from the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES).

Hurricane Patrick fueled by unprecedented warm waters in the Pacific

Western U.S. Braces for Onset of El Niño Storms

This year’s strong El Niño is wreaking havoc around the world, including in the U.S., where Californians are bracing for the onset of a series of expected storms.

GDP, Incomes Likely to Fall as Climate Warming Continues

With global mean temperature setting new record-highs, new research from Stanford and UCal Berkeley concludes economic output will peak and then decline rapidly this century. More than 70 percent of the world’s nations are likely to experience declines in economic output this century, with countries in already warm climate zones affected the most.