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Ocean Acidity Rising 10x Faster Than At Any Time in the Past 55 Million Years

Ocean acidification continues to rise at a rate “unprecedented in Earth’s history,” a direct result of past and current increases in carbon and greenhouse gas emissions, posing significant threats to the health and integrity of marine ecosystems and the diverse range of products and services they provide the world over, according to a report produced by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme,…

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Warming Ocean Portends Troubling Changes at the Base of the Marine Food Web

Conducting research of potentially vital importance to marine and coastal zone resource policy makers and managers, fisheries managers, fishing communities and stakeholders worldwide, researchers from the University of East Anglia’s (UEA) School of Environmental Sciences and School of Computing Sciences and the University of Exeter have found that warming ocean temperatures pose potentially grave risks to the marine food web….

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Analogues from Earth’s Past Bode Ill for Coral Reefs, Marine Ecosystems

In a bid to anticipate the effects of a warming world, climate scientists around the world are scouring the geological record for modern-day analogues – periods of Earth history when the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere reached or exceeded the 400 parts per million (ppm) we find today. Delving into climate, marine biology, ecosystems and the marine…

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Post-Industrial Age Black Carbon Deposits Help Accelerate Loss of Glacial Ice, Marine Ecosystem Changes

Black carbon from man-made burning of fossil fuels and biomass is helping accelerate glacial ice loss at the Mendenhall Glacier and is changing the marine ecosystem in the Gulf of Alaska, a scientific research team finds.

Washington State Pushed to Recognize Threat of Ocean Acidification to Coastal Waters

Ocean acidification is receiving greater attention from marine scientists as ocean waters worldwide have been found to be getting more acidic. Absorbing and storing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, the world ocean – including the plankton, coral and shellfish that live in it – is the largest carbon sink on the planet, but its capacity is limited. Atmospheric carbon dioxide…

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Deep Ocean Argo Floats, New Approach Yield New Insights into Ocean Acidification

Thanks to the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration and a joint US-Canadian research team, it is now possible for marine scientists to use satellite data from five-foot-tall Argo floats that drift with deep ocean currents to remotely monitor ocean acidity (pH) and the total carbon dioxide (CO2) content of seawater to better understand changes in ocean chemistry.