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Information is Power: Böll Foundation Releases Inaugural World Ocean Atlas

Highlighting the threats and costs climate change and human activites are having on the world ocean, the Heinrich Böll Foundation released its inaugural “Ocean Atlas 2017.”

Dead-Zone Nutrient Reduction Target Pushed Out to 2035

Progress has been achieved in certain watersheds, but pushing back the target date to reduce run-off of nitrogen and phosphorous two decades is a testament to the extent and intractability of the problem.

$11.9 Trillion: Price Tag on Climate Change Coral Reef Impacts

Small island developing states (SIDS) are being affected disproportionately by sea level rise and the effects of climate change. They’re calling for change, releasing two research studies and urging drastic changes to reduce fossil fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions.

Are Hawaii's fishermen the scapegoats over environmental problems of which they have no control?

Hawaii’s Fishermen: Scapegoats for Forces Outside their Control

Land use practices and development, along with climate change and other agents, are taking a toll on fisheries in Hawaii and across the Western Pacific, highlighting an increasingly pressing need for policy makers, regulators and other stakeholders to collaborate in crafting holistic, integrated marine resource management and climate change adaptation strategies, local fishermen said at a meeting of the Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council.

193 Governments Agree to Boost Funding for Biodiversity Protection

To a man, or government rather, all parties to the UN Convention on Biological Diversity–developed and developing nations alike–agreed to increase funding for biodiversity protection, a sign that government leaders are increasingly aware of the profound threats the extraordinary loss of plant and animal species that’s taking place poses to human societies and civilization the world over.

Deep Ocean Argo Floats, New Approach Yield New Insights into Ocean Acidification

Thanks to the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration and a joint US-Canadian research team, it is now possible for marine scientists to use satellite data from five-foot-tall Argo floats that drift with deep ocean currents to remotely monitor ocean acidity (pH) and the total carbon dioxide (CO2) content of seawater to better understand changes in ocean chemistry.