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Desert agriculture may amplify the process of burying carbon deep below the surface in aquifers

A Hidden Carbon Sink Underneath the World’s Deserts?

About 40 percent of the carbon dioxide released from deforestation and burning fossil fuel stays in the atmosphere. Another 30 percent is taken up in the oceans. It was thought that the remaining 30 percent of anthropogenic carbon was absorbed by plants on land, but subsequent measurements didn’t bear that out, leading to the question of the “missing carbon sink.” The…

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First High-Fidelity Maps of Carbon Stocks in Mexico, Peru

Researchers and governments in Mexico and Peru collaborated to produce quickly and cheaply produce national inventories of carbon stocks that could prove invaluable to reducing deforestation and carbon emissions, and charting sustainable development pathways.

Plants are hard at work absorbing carbon

New Study Shows Plants Absorb Carbon From Atmosphere Faster Than Perviously Thought

New research just published in the journal Nature say that plants, trees, and soil are absorbing carbon about 25 percent faster than scientists previously thought. A team of scientists headed-up by Lisa Welp-Smith of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography have developed a new, more accurate, method of determining how much plants absorb and release carbon. The study estimates that global…

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1993 US Northwest Forest Plan Turns Public Forests into Carbon Sink

Successful in realizing its original goal, the 1993 US Northwest Forest Plan is yielding unanticipated benefits two decades later, turning northwest public forests into net carbon sinks for the first time in decades.

Geologists Find Young Rock Ready To Absorb 4 Billion Tons Of Carbon

Geologists in Oman have found a type of rock that can be used to soak up huge quantities of carbon dioxide. The rock, known as peridotite, lies in a layer of rock at or just under the surface of a stretch of Omani desert the size of Massachusetts. It harbors the potential to clean up 4 billion tons of CO2…

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