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Desert agriculture may amplify the process of burying carbon deep below the surface in aquifers

A Hidden Carbon Sink Underneath the World’s Deserts?

About 40 percent of the carbon dioxide released from deforestation and burning fossil fuel stays in the atmosphere. Another 30 percent is taken up in the oceans. It was thought that the remaining 30 percent of anthropogenic carbon was absorbed by plants on land, but subsequent measurements didn’t bear that out, leading to the question of the “missing carbon sink.” The…

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Record-breaking temperature in London on July 1st, 2015

June 2015 Hottest on Record: Super El Niño, Heatwaves, Record Precipitation and Drought

According to data released this week by the Japan Meteorological Agency,  June 2015 was the hottest June in the global record. On Wednesday NASA reported similar findings, with 2015 tied with 1998 as the warmest on record. What is considered one of the strongest El Niños in 50 years underpins the ongoing global warming trend, making expectations for 2015 to beat last year as the…

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Our Common Future Under Climate Change

Our Common Future Under Climate Change: The Challenge and Opportunity

Living in a post-carbon world – The largest international scientific meeting on climate change concluded this week in Paris, reinforcing the idea that 2015 is a crossroads for action on global warming. The international conference Our Common Future Under Climate Change (CFCC15) included 2000 scientists from nearly 100 countries discussing a large breadth of interests and disciplines. A total of 165 session over…

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Arctic Sea Ice Loss Raises Prospect of a Colder Europe

Arctic warming and sea ice loss is reducing ocean-atmosphere heat exchange and the flow of ocean waters that fuel the Gulf Stream and Atlantic Meridional Overtuning Circulation, according to groundbreaking new oceanographic climate research. That raises the prospect of a much colder Europe,

climate-action-smokestack-dusk

Analysis Shows Benefits, Costs of Climate Change Action, Inaction

12,000 deaths a year in 49 US cities could be avoided if strong actions to reduce GHG emissions and address climate warming, according to a peer-reviews analysis released Monday by the EPA’s Climate Change Impacts and Risk Analysis project. That’s just one benefit. Compared to a scenario of inaction, taking strong climate action would avoid approximately 13,000 deaths in 2050 and 57,000 deaths annually in 2100 from poor air quality. Delay will result in these costs rising over the course of the 21st century, the report says.

NASA global warming map

NASA Dataset Projects Climate Change in the 21st Century

The high-resolution, 11-terabyte global climate change dataset includes historic data from 1950-2011 and projected changes in temperatures and rainfall based “business as usual” and ‘extreme reductions’ in greenhouse gas emissions.

Human Anti-intellectualism will leave a parched earth for our progeny

Opposition to Science Invites a Climate Catastrophe

Our efforts must be informed by science if we are to seriously address the threat of climate change. However, there are a significant number of people, corporations and governments that are resistant to scientific discourse. Science is at the heart of environmentalism. On a wide range of issues, it is the work of scientists that has brought important issues to…

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